April 13, 2014
breakingnews:

Major earthquake hits off the Solomon Islands
BBC News: A powerful magnitude 7.5 earthquake has hit off the south coast of the Solomon Islands, in the second major earthquake near the country in 24 hours
 Photo: Map from USGS showing location of earthquake.

breakingnews:

Major earthquake hits off the Solomon Islands

BBC News: A powerful magnitude 7.5 earthquake has hit off the south coast of the Solomon Islands, in the second major earthquake near the country in 24 hours

Photo: Map from USGS showing location of earthquake.

April 13, 2014
centuriespast:

Lacemaker, c. 1650
Girolamo Forabosco
Italian, 1604/05-1679Oil on canvas32-1/2 x 26 in. (82.6 x 66.0 cm)The Norton Simon Foundation

centuriespast:

Lacemaker, c. 1650

Girolamo Forabosco

Italian, 1604/05-1679
Oil on canvas
32-1/2 x 26 in. (82.6 x 66.0 cm)
The Norton Simon Foundation

April 13, 2014
allthingseurope:

Ennery, France (by didier95)

allthingseurope:

Ennery, France (by didier95)

April 13, 2014
thecivilwarparlor:

Robert E. Lee - Fashion Plate
Robert E. Lee, age 38, poses with his son, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, 8, around the year 1845. At the time, Lee was twenty years into his military career having entered West Point in 1825, graduated second in his class, and earned a place in the Corps of Engineers. Historian Emory M. Thomas has suggested that “Lee is quite the fashion plate” in this image.
"His long, large sideburns, striped trousers, counter–striped vest, and hand–in–coat pose all seem a bit more pretentious than Lee usually was.” Thomas’s desire to judge Lee’s dress in the context of his character fits into a long tradition that includes Lost Cause biographers who saw his crisp Civil War–era attire as a reflection of “his modest humility, simplicity, and gentleness.”
Lee’s son, for a time nicknamed Rooney, ended the Civil War as second in command of the Confederate cavalry. He later served in the Senate of Virginia (1875–1878) and the United States House of Representatives (1887–1891).
Source: Encyclopedia Virgina

thecivilwarparlor:

Robert E. Lee - Fashion Plate

Robert E. Lee, age 38, poses with his son, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, 8, around the year 1845. At the time, Lee was twenty years into his military career having entered West Point in 1825, graduated second in his class, and earned a place in the Corps of Engineers. Historian Emory M. Thomas has suggested that “Lee is quite the fashion plate” in this image.

  • "His long, large sideburns, striped trousers, counter–striped vest, and hand–in–coat pose all seem a bit more pretentious than Lee usually was.” Thomas’s desire to judge Lee’s dress in the context of his character fits into a long tradition that includes Lost Cause biographers who saw his crisp Civil War–era attire as a reflection of “his modest humility, simplicity, and gentleness.”

Lee’s son, for a time nicknamed Rooney, ended the Civil War as second in command of the Confederate cavalry. He later served in the Senate of Virginia (1875–1878) and the United States House of Representatives (1887–1891).

Source: Encyclopedia Virgina

April 13, 2014
breakingnews:

Foreigners take part in North Korea’s marathon
AP: North Korea’s annual marathon opened to foreign amateur runners for the first time on Sunday, as runners from 27 different countries took part.
A truck playing patriotic music on loudspeakers followed the runners as they raced through the course. North Korean nationals won both the men and women’s events.
Photo: Runners pass under a pedestrian bridge in central Pyongyang. (David Guttenfelder / AP via NBCNews.com)

breakingnews:

Foreigners take part in North Korea’s marathon

APNorth Korea’s annual marathon opened to foreign amateur runners for the first time on Sunday, as runners from 27 different countries took part.

A truck playing patriotic music on loudspeakers followed the runners as they raced through the course. North Korean nationals won both the men and women’s events.

Photo: Runners pass under a pedestrian bridge in central Pyongyang. (David Guttenfelder / AP via NBCNews.com)

April 12, 2014
The History of Macaroni and Cheese

uicspecialcollections:

Food History Friday! What’s your favorite kind of mac and cheese?

April 12, 2014
newsweek:

As potential 2016 candidates gather their policy advisors and begin to isolate their views on key issues, they may want to consider one above the rest — weed.
You can make stoner jokes all you want, but marijuana policy stands to affect just as many Americans as immigration policy does in the coming years. And while Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio have made their views on border control clear, the fast-changing weed landscape (a full 54 percent of Americans now favor legalization) has left Republicans and Democrats all over the map when it comes to toking.
Some have been altogether mum on the topic — the last time Hillary Clinton spoke publicly about weed policy was during the 2008 campaign. In 2012, it was laughable to think that Colorado would legalize recreational weed.
Less than two years later, 75 percent of Americans think legalization nationwide is inevitable. Even President Obama has deemed pot no more dangerous than alcohol.
Suddenly, a majority of Americans are comfortable with their neighbors smoking pot, and politicians will have to decide whether or not they should embrace that or take a more cautious position.
Former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer tells The Wall Street Journal, “All of a sudden the ground is shifting, and it’s uncomfortable and complicated. Marijuana has become an issue that candidates have got to pay attention to.”
Back in October, The New Republic’s Nate Cohn imagined how candidates could use the issue against each other in the primaries: “Many candidates will have incentives to use the issue, whether it’s a cultural conservative using marijuana to hurt Rand Paul among evangelicals in Iowa, or a liberal trying to stoke a progressive revolt against Clinton’s candidacy.”
So will presidential hopefuls come out joints blazing in 2016? That remains to be seen. Here’s where the candidates stand now:
Weed Is the Sleeper Issue of 2016 - The Wire

newsweek:

As potential 2016 candidates gather their policy advisors and begin to isolate their views on key issues, they may want to consider one above the rest — weed.

You can make stoner jokes all you want, but marijuana policy stands to affect just as many Americans as immigration policy does in the coming years. And while Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio have made their views on border control clear, the fast-changing weed landscape (a full 54 percent of Americans now favor legalization) has left Republicans and Democrats all over the map when it comes to toking.

Some have been altogether mum on the topic — the last time Hillary Clinton spoke publicly about weed policy was during the 2008 campaign. In 2012, it was laughable to think that Colorado would legalize recreational weed.

Less than two years later, 75 percent of Americans think legalization nationwide is inevitable. Even President Obama has deemed pot no more dangerous than alcohol.

Suddenly, a majority of Americans are comfortable with their neighbors smoking pot, and politicians will have to decide whether or not they should embrace that or take a more cautious position.

Former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer tells The Wall Street Journal, “All of a sudden the ground is shifting, and it’s uncomfortable and complicated. Marijuana has become an issue that candidates have got to pay attention to.”

Back in October, The New Republic’s Nate Cohn imagined how candidates could use the issue against each other in the primaries: “Many candidates will have incentives to use the issue, whether it’s a cultural conservative using marijuana to hurt Rand Paul among evangelicals in Iowa, or a liberal trying to stoke a progressive revolt against Clinton’s candidacy.”

So will presidential hopefuls come out joints blazing in 2016? That remains to be seen. Here’s where the candidates stand now:

Weed Is the Sleeper Issue of 2016 - The Wire

April 12, 2014
"The best way to stop homelessness is mindbogglingly simple: Give them homes."

Housing The Homeless Saves Money—Here’s The Research That Proves It (via fastcompany)

(via fastcompany)

April 12, 2014
huffingtonpost:

Late night? Here’s 7 ways to ease a nasty hangover.

huffingtonpost:

Late night? Here’s 7 ways to ease a nasty hangover.

April 12, 2014
newsweek:

When Colorado legalized recreational marijuana sales, Denver embraced the opportunity with open arms.
The city is now home to more than 62 percent of all Colorado recreational marijuana retailers, who cashed in on $14 million in sales in January alone.
Other cities weren’t so eager: heeding legalization opponents’ safety concerns, several pushed off licensing retail sales. Some banned retail sales altogether.
"There will be many harmful consequences," Douglas County Sheriff David Weaver warned in a September 2012 statement. "Expect more crime, more kids using marijuana, and pot for sale everywhere."
Remember when legal marijuana was going to send crime skyrocketing? - Vox

newsweek:

When Colorado legalized recreational marijuana sales, Denver embraced the opportunity with open arms.

The city is now home to more than 62 percent of all Colorado recreational marijuana retailers, who cashed in on $14 million in sales in January alone.

Other cities weren’t so eager: heeding legalization opponents’ safety concerns, several pushed off licensing retail sales. Some banned retail sales altogether.

"There will be many harmful consequences," Douglas County Sheriff David Weaver warned in a September 2012 statement. "Expect more crime, more kids using marijuana, and pot for sale everywhere."

Remember when legal marijuana was going to send crime skyrocketing? - Vox