October 1, 2014
ancientpeoples:

Terracotta statuette of a woman looking into a box mirror 
3rd-2nd Century BC
Hellenistic
This woman holds a box mirror on her knee. The lid has dropped and she gazes into the reflective surface, which would have been of highly polished bronze.
(Source: The Met Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta statuette of a woman looking into a box mirror 

3rd-2nd Century BC

Hellenistic

This woman holds a box mirror on her knee. The lid has dropped and she gazes into the reflective surface, which would have been of highly polished bronze.

(Source: The Met Museum)

October 1, 2014
Mary Cassatt’s Pastels Now on Display at the National Gallery

ummaannex:

image

The pastels Mary Cassatt, female impressionist artist, used to create her work are now on display at the National Gallery in Washington DC. Listen to this NPR story about the history of these cool artifacts. 

(via washingtonpost)

October 1, 2014

mypubliclands:

Thanks to the many volunteers who spent time at National Public Lands Day events today, enjoying and improving the public lands we all love. And a special thanks to BLM staff, partners and volunteers who braved the weather for a successful NPLD condor release in Arizona.

We close the day with photos of White Pocket in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument by Bob Wick, where our condors fly tonight.

The towering escarpments of the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument and nearby wilderness areas provide ideal habitat for the condors. Here they can safely nest among the ledges and soar. Mitch Owens BLM Vermilion Cliffs National Monument Outdoor Recreation Planner.

Stay tuned next week for more photos and stories from our day of “CondorsOnTheRise”.

October 1, 2014
thecivilwarparlor:

General Bryan Grimes - Fights In And Survives Nearly All The Battles Of The Eastern Theater Of The Civil War- Only To Later Be Murdered
He was a member of one of the oldest and wealthiest families in North Carolina
Grimes saw frequent combat. Demonstrating great courage and fortitude, and often placing himself in great personal danger, he won rapid promotion and suffered many wounds. He was a North Carolina plantation owner and a general officer in the Confederate Army 

1849: In 1849, his father gave him the Grimesland estate, along with control over its 100 slaves.


1861: He resigned from the commission after the passage of the Ordinance of Secession and joined the Confederate Army as the major of the newly formed 4th North Carolina Infantry on May 16, 1861.


1862: On June 19, 1862, Grimes was promoted to the rank of colonel and given command of the 4th North Carolina Infantry, now part of the Army of Northern Virginia.


1865: On February 15, 1865, he was promoted to major general, the last man appointed to that rank in the Army of Northern Virginia.


1865: Following the Appomattox Campaign, he surrendered along with the rest of the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, 1865, and was paroled at Appomattox Court House.


1867: He subsequently moved back to Grimesland in January 1867 and resumed farming.


1880: In 1880, Grimes was ambushed and killed in Pitt County, North Carolina, by a hired assassin named William Parker, presumably to prevent him from testifying at a criminal trial. Although acquitted of Grimes’s murder, the assassin was lynched by an angry mob seven years later when he bragged that he had killed Grimes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryan_Grimes
http://blog.ecu.edu/sites/staffpick/eurl.axd/482b919b53b3494e9446bb0ae7799109/?p=570
Photo colorized by S.Palmer @TheCivilWarParlorTumblr.com

thecivilwarparlor:

General Bryan Grimes - Fights In And Survives Nearly All The Battles Of The Eastern Theater Of The Civil War- Only To Later Be Murdered

He was a member of one of the oldest and wealthiest families in North Carolina

Grimes saw frequent combat. Demonstrating great courage and fortitude, and often placing himself in great personal danger, he won rapid promotion and suffered many wounds. He was a North Carolina plantation owner and a general officer in the Confederate Army

1849: In 1849, his father gave him the Grimesland estate, along with control over its 100 slaves.
1861: He resigned from the commission after the passage of the Ordinance of Secession and joined the Confederate Army as the major of the newly formed 4th North Carolina Infantry on May 16, 1861.
1862: On June 19, 1862, Grimes was promoted to the rank of colonel and given command of the 4th North Carolina Infantry, now part of the Army of Northern Virginia.
1865: On February 15, 1865, he was promoted to major general, the last man appointed to that rank in the Army of Northern Virginia.
1865: Following the Appomattox Campaign, he surrendered along with the rest of the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, 1865, and was paroled at Appomattox Court House.
1867: He subsequently moved back to Grimesland in January 1867 and resumed farming.
1880: In 1880, Grimes was ambushed and killed in Pitt County, North Carolina, by a hired assassin named William Parker, presumably to prevent him from testifying at a criminal trial. Although acquitted of Grimes’s murder, the assassin was lynched by an angry mob seven years later when he bragged that he had killed Grimes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryan_Grimes

http://blog.ecu.edu/sites/staffpick/eurl.axd/482b919b53b3494e9446bb0ae7799109/?p=570

Photo colorized by S.Palmer @TheCivilWarParlorTumblr.com

September 30, 2014
thecivilwarparlor:

Skulls and bones of unburied soldiers on south side of Plank Road in 1865. Photographed by a member of the field staff organized by M. B. Brady and possibly by George N. Barnard.
Chancellorsville: Fitzhugh Lee found the entire right side of the Federal lines in the middle of open field, guarded merely by two guns that faced westward, as well as the supplies and rear encampments. The men were eating and playing games in carefree fashion, completely unaware that an entire Confederate corps was less than a mile away. What happened next is given in Fitzhugh Lee’s own words:
So impressed was I with my discovery, that I rode rapidly back to the point on the Plank road where I had left my cavalry, and back down the road Jackson was moving, until I met “Stonewall” himself. “General,” said I, “if you will ride with me, halting your column here, out of sight, I will show you the enemy’s right, and you will perceive the great advantage of attacking down the Old turnpike instead of the Plank road, the enemy’s lines being taken in reverse. Bring only one courier, as you will be in view from the top of the hill.” Jackson assented, and I rapidly conducted him to the point of observation. There had been no change in the picture.
I only knew Jackson slightly. I watched him closely as he gazed upon Howard’s troops. It was then about 2 P.M. His eyes burned with a brilliant glow, lighting up a sad face. His expression was one of intense interest, his face was colored slightly with the paint of approaching battle, and radiant at the success of his flank movement. To the remarks made to him while the unconscious line of blue was pointed out, he did not reply once during the five minutes he was on the hill, and yet his lips were moving. From what I have read and heard of Jackson since that day, I know now what he was doing then. Oh! “beware of rashness,” General Hooker. Stonewall Jackson is praying in full view and in rear of your right flank! While talking to the Great God of Battles, how could he hear what a poor cavalryman was saying. “Tell General Rodes,” said he, suddenly whirling his horse towards the courier, “to move across the Old plank road; halt when he gets to the Old turnpike, and I will join him there.” One more look upon the Federal lines, and then he rode rapidly down the hill, his arms flapping to the motion of his horse, over whose head it seemed, good rider as he was, he would certainly go. I expected to be told I had made a valuable personal reconnaissance—saving the lives of many soldiers, and that Jackson was indebted to me to that amount at least. Perhaps I might have been a little chagrined at Jackson’s silence, and hence commented inwardly and adversely upon his horsemanship. Alas! I had looked upon him for the last time.
— Fitzhugh Lee, address to the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, 1879
 Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonewall_Jackson

thecivilwarparlor:

Skulls and bones of unburied soldiers on south side of Plank Road in 1865. Photographed by a member of the field staff organized by M. B. Brady and possibly by George N. Barnard.

Chancellorsville: Fitzhugh Lee found the entire right side of the Federal lines in the middle of open field, guarded merely by two guns that faced westward, as well as the supplies and rear encampments. The men were eating and playing games in carefree fashion, completely unaware that an entire Confederate corps was less than a mile away. What happened next is given in Fitzhugh Lee’s own words:

So impressed was I with my discovery, that I rode rapidly back to the point on the Plank road where I had left my cavalry, and back down the road Jackson was moving, until I met “Stonewall” himself. “General,” said I, “if you will ride with me, halting your column here, out of sight, I will show you the enemy’s right, and you will perceive the great advantage of attacking down the Old turnpike instead of the Plank road, the enemy’s lines being taken in reverse. Bring only one courier, as you will be in view from the top of the hill.” Jackson assented, and I rapidly conducted him to the point of observation. There had been no change in the picture.

I only knew Jackson slightly. I watched him closely as he gazed upon Howard’s troops. It was then about 2 P.M. His eyes burned with a brilliant glow, lighting up a sad face. His expression was one of intense interest, his face was colored slightly with the paint of approaching battle, and radiant at the success of his flank movement. To the remarks made to him while the unconscious line of blue was pointed out, he did not reply once during the five minutes he was on the hill, and yet his lips were moving. From what I have read and heard of Jackson since that day, I know now what he was doing then. Oh! “beware of rashness,” General Hooker. Stonewall Jackson is praying in full view and in rear of your right flank! While talking to the Great God of Battles, how could he hear what a poor cavalryman was saying. “Tell General Rodes,” said he, suddenly whirling his horse towards the courier, “to move across the Old plank road; halt when he gets to the Old turnpike, and I will join him there.” One more look upon the Federal lines, and then he rode rapidly down the hill, his arms flapping to the motion of his horse, over whose head it seemed, good rider as he was, he would certainly go. I expected to be told I had made a valuable personal reconnaissance—saving the lives of many soldiers, and that Jackson was indebted to me to that amount at least. Perhaps I might have been a little chagrined at Jackson’s silence, and hence commented inwardly and adversely upon his horsemanship. Alas! I had looked upon him for the last time.

— Fitzhugh Lee, address to the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, 1879

 Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonewall_Jackson

September 30, 2014

thecivilwarparlor:

Major General E. O. C. Ord And Staff

Edward Otho Cresap Ord  1818 – 1883 was an American engineer and Army Officer officer who saw action in the Seminole War, the Indian Wars and the Civil War. He commanded an army during the final days of the Civil War, and was instrumental in forcing the surrender of General Robert E. Lee. He also designed Fort Sam Houston. He died in Havana, Cuba of Yellow Fever. 

  • There is a bust of Ord at Grant’s Tomb in New York City depicting him as one of five (Sherman, Thomas, McPherson, Sheridan and Ord) sentinels watching over the tomb of President Ulysses S. Grant.

Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Ord

September 30, 2014
allthingseurope:

Turin, Italy (by cepernich odino)

allthingseurope:

Turin, Italy (by cepernich odino)

September 30, 2014
travelingcolors:

Lake Nakuru National Park | Kenya (by Nacho Coca)

travelingcolors:

Lake Nakuru National Park | Kenya (by Nacho Coca)

(via travelingcolors)

September 29, 2014
arthistorycq:

centuriespast:

Syrian-style openwork plaque with a striding sphinx, ca. 9th–8th century B.C. Neo-Assyrian period. Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu). Ivory. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,

The face is captivating

arthistorycq:

centuriespast:

Syrian-style openwork plaque with a striding sphinx, ca. 9th–8th century B.C. Neo-Assyrian period. Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu). Ivory. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,

The face is captivating

September 29, 2014
allthingseurope:

Dubrovnik, Croatia (by david.bank (www.david-bank.com))

allthingseurope:

Dubrovnik, Croatia (by david.bank (www.david-bank.com))